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Submitted by Jonah de Vera Johanna Marie Nicolas Business Department Assumption College San Lorenzo Village, Makati March 6, 2008 I. Introduction Diabetes was known way back by physicians of Ancient Greece and named as such and means “siphon” in Greek and was not as spectacular as it is now. Doctors and scientists think diabetes may be caused by viruses, genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise. Diabetes is one of the major leading causes of death in the Philippines.

In 2002, it was the 6th leading cause of death in the United State alone. It cost US $ 132 billion per year for direct and indirect costs on the part of the government. Also in the United States the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that, diabetes will affect one in three people known in the United States. It also projects an increase by 165% by 2050 which is very alarming. Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the person fails to get the benefit of the food which he or she eats, particularly sugar and starch.

There are three types of diabetes: Juvenile diabetes, Adult-onset diabetes and Gestalt diabetes. Any person of any age can contract the disease whether through hereditary or acquired by chance. It has global and societal implications and is now called an epidemic. The researchers would focus more on the type one (1) diabetes which is Juvenile Insulin Dependent Diabetes or JIDD which affects children or ages under 4o, and is triggered by environmental factors such as viruses, diet or chemical in people genetically predisposed.

This paper was prepared in order for the researchers as well as the readers to know the emotional effects of Juvenile Diabetes in children particularly since birth up to age 16, how these young people deal or cope up with this kind of disease and the reaction of the children when they knew that they have diabetes. A through discussion of the emotional effects of Juvenile Diabetes will be taken up and therefore have a better understanding of the disease. A. Background of the Study

Juvenile Diabetes formerly known as Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) or childhood diabetes is characterized by loss of the insulin-producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas leading to a deficiency of insulin. It is estimated that 10-15% people are diagnosed with diabetes have type one (1). People with type one (1) diabetes must inject themselves with insulin followed by a careful diet and exercise and monitor their blood glucose levels using blood testing monitors. Insulin therapy may be required through the young person’s life.

Therapy needed not adversely affect the child’s activities, growth rate or psychological or intellectual development. Diabetes is common in the family of the researchers one is Juvenile and the other is Adult-onset. Since Juvenile diabetes in the family is more on adults, the researchers decided to come up with a study about the emotional effects of Juvenile diabetes in children particularly since birth up to age 16. They wanted to know the different emotions felt, their reaction when they knew that they have diabetes, how they were able to deal or cope up with this disease and how they were able to adjust in life despite of their sickness.

As the researchers find out the answers to their questions about the emotional effects of Juvenile diabetes in children through interview and questionnaire method, they wanted to be a bridge in making a difference in the lives of these children. A. Statement of the Problem or Research Objectives The researchers would like to know the emotional state of Juvenile Diabetes in children since birth up to age 16. Main Objective: The researchers chose this project for them to have a better understanding of juvenile diabetes and the emotional effects of this disease in children since birth up to age 16.

Specific Objectives or Research Questions: 1. To open the minds of the society that children with Juvenile diabetes needs special care and attention. 2. To study the different emotions involved in having Juvenile diabetes and how to cope with it. 3. To give proper ways of treatment and management of Juvenile diabetes in children. A. Significance of the Study Each individual is unique. No man is an island. It doesn’t mean that we have a disorder or disease; we would be different from other people. Diabetes is a serious disease and is very alarming.

The significance of this study is to open the minds of the people that children with Juvenile diabetes needs more love, care and attention than any other material things in this world. Not only should Juvenile diabetes be given attention but also other diseases as well. The researchers wanted to have a better understanding of the emotional state of the children with Juvenile diabetes and that there are several ways to cope with their emotions and the disease as well. Lastly, the significance of this study is to encourage these children that their sickness is not a hindrance to them but rather a key to move on in life.

Delimitation In order to achieve the objectives of the project, the researchers would gather information about juvenile diabetes and come up with a summary of the topic. The researchers would also go to hospitals such as National Children’s Hospital in E. Rodriguez, Quezon City in schools such as Sacred Heart Academy and Immaculate Conception to look for young patients who has juvenile diabetes. They would as well conduct a survey in their family and friends who has juvenile diabetes. They would interview the patients and come up with a report about the interview.

The scholars would as well talk to professional doctors such as Diabetes expertise and Psychologist to ask questions regarding the mental, physical, social and emotional effects of Juvenile diabetes in children. In case of having problems finding for children with Juvenile diabetes, they would conduct a survey to people from age 25 up to 75 but had juvenile diabetes since birth up to age 16. A. Terms Diabetes – a disease caused by an insulin deficiency and characterized b y excess sugar in the blood and urine. Insulin – a hormone vital to arbohydrate metabolism, secreted by islets of tissue in the pancreas. Juvenile diabetes – young or immature, also known as type 1 diabetes that lacks insulin-producing beta cells. Adult-onset diabetes – most common form of diabetes that does not need to be injected by insulin. Gestalt diabetes – another form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy that involves a combination of inadequate insulin secretion and responsiveness resembling type 2 diabetes. Stress – strain felt by somebody: mental, emotional, or physical strain caused, e. g. by anxiety or overwork.

It may cause such symptoms as raised blood pressure or depression. Glucose – sugar energy source: a six-carbon monosaccharide produced in plants by photosynthesis and in animals by the metabolism of carbohydrates. The commonest form, dextrose, is used by all living organisms. Chemical imbalance – a term used as a lay explanation of mental illness or mental disorders. The basic concept is that a chemical imbalance within the brain is main the cause of a psychiatric conditions and that these conditions can be improved with meditation which correct this imbalance.

Anti-depressants – a psychiatric medication or other substance (nutrient or herb) used for alleviating depression or dysthymia (milder depression). These medications are now amongst the drugs most commonly prescribed by psychiatrists and general practitioners, and their effectiveness and adverse effects are the subject of many studies and competing claims. Pancreatitis – pancreatic inflammation; inflammation of the pancreas. Hypoglycemia – too little blood sugar: the medical condition of having n unusually low level of sugar in the blood. Hyperglycemia – too much sugar in the blood: an unusually high level of sugar in the blood.

II. Survey of Related Literature and Conceptual Framework 1. Survey of Related Literature and Review of Related Studies The following related literature and studies written by foreign authors gave the information needed by the writers of this study. Juvenile Diabetes formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or childhood diabetes is a chronic lifelong disease that up to now the cause is unknown and there is no cure for it. It is usually caused when the immune system attacks the beta cells of the pancreas and the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. 1] It requires multiple insulin injections just to survive, is hard to manage since glucose levels and diet should be monitored, carries devastating complications such as heart problems, blindness and kidney failure and can result in the drastic reduction in the lifestyle and mobility of a person, quality of life and a reduction in the life span of man. More than 400,000 new cases are reported in children and adults up to age 24 in the United States each year. And more than 1 million Americans currently live with the condition. [2] Studies have shown that challenges of a child or teen diagnosed with Juvenile diabetes are many.

A lot of children especially teenagers think that they’re different from their friends. Some parents overprotect their diabetic children and unnecessarily make invalids of them. Anxiety is one of the psychological factors that affect children with Juvenile diabetes. The development of a portable infusion device in 1990, the infusion pump is an alternative of insulin injections that is used by people who are anxious to attain perfect control. Up to this present time, the use of infusion pump is still a wave. There are some ways to treat and manage diabetes. 3] And these are: A. Diet A. 1 Reduce the total amount of food For type 1 diabetes, a strict diet and schedule of meals are necessary to control blood glucose levels. A. 2 Lower the Carbohydrates Next is to limit the sugar and starch-carbohydrate in the diet because from sugar and starch, sugar is most readily formed. B. Exercise Exercise does everything for a diabetic, but there are limitations. Exercise to be advantageous requires insulin. Exercise is good for the diabetic of mild or moderate severity. Any patient who cannot exercise is handicapped.

Exercise lowers the sugar in the blood just as does lack of food (fasting) and insulin. C. Insulin Develop a regular schedule of insulin injections using faster-acting forms of insulin or combinations of both slower-acting and fast-acting forms of insulin. Set a target range of blood glucose level, say between 70 and 140 mg/dl. If blood glucose levels falls below 70 mg/dl or rise above 140 mg/dl, then the diabetic need to take action to increase or decrease them. [4] Children with diabetes affect their personality. Attitudes of others toward us become an essential part of our own personalities.

Attitudes, beliefs and purposes color the person’s interpretation of the outer environment. This inner aspect of the personality comprises the emotional life of the individual, his interpretation of himself and of the external environment. The attitude which a person develops towards himself, too, influences his attitude toward others. [5] Just like some cases of children with type 1 diabetes, he or she feels left out or unwanted because of his disease and may develop attitudes of resentment toward others. He may, on the other hand, become shy and retired that he does not give himself a chance to rectify his original feeling.

Since he believes that he is unwanted, he may avoid group activities, avoid acquaintances or simply stay away from people and do things on his own. Psychologists find that personality assessment as a valuable tool for identifying the consistencies in people’s behaviors, attitudes, and feelings across time and situations. According to Newman and Newman, there are nine basic emotions: excitement, surprise, sadness, joy, anger, fear, disgust, guilt and love. Some of these emotions are taken by the writers to have a view about the emotions of children with juvenile diabetes. [6]

InputProcessOutput Emotion: • Surprise* Children will be surprised when they* Sudden change of knew that they have diabetes. It is reaction something new to them and would take a lot of responsibility • Sadness* Children will feel depressed and* Loss of object, would think that they’re differentopportunity or ideal • Anger* Tension will rise up upon knowing* Threat to oneself that this child has diabetes. He canor to one’s offspring, also blame his parents or his self andfrustration either do physical or verbal acts Fear* The child would feel terror and * The child will be would panic because they canshocked and would think that having diabetes isthink that their a threat to themsickness is a hindrance to them. * Guilt* Signals wrong doing of child* Violations of cultural norms, unacceptable thoughts or ideals * Love* Binds people together, * An attractive or Prompts nurturanceidealized person, object, or group The researchers aim is to study the effects of juvenile diabetes in children and one factor that is involved in this study is to know the emotions of a child.

These factors if analyzed deeply, shows various emotions that can be observed in a patient with juvenile diabetes. These emotions show the reaction of a child when he knew that he has diabetes. The input shows the emotions, the process shows the functions of the input and the output shows the stimuli of the input and process. Many people with diabetes feel blamed or criticized for their efforts at diabetes care. When someone you care about has diabetes, simply listening to how he feels about living with diabetes can be the most loving act in coping with diabetes. [7] Having diabetes can change lifestyle, eating habits and daily activities.

Diabetes may have been prescribed new medications. And most likely, they were told how to check their blood glucose on a regular basis. Diabetes can cause feelings of depression and isolation, weak havoc with self-esteem, and cause them to be stressed. A lot of diabetes patients deals with their emotions. Some of the emotions they experience as they deal with their disease may make them feel bad. But some feelings may actually be useful in helping them come to terms with their new lifestyle. For example, denial can be part of nature’s way of letting the news of diabetes sink gradually.

Even anger can be an alloy in dealing with diabetes if they channel their energy in a direction that helps them change their condition. The key to deal with emotions is to understand feelings without trying to suppress or deny them. Some emotions might require immediate attention and others may not. Some people find that it helps to indulge their feelings for a little while like a week or two or maybe month before mustering up wherewithal to meet problems head on. Upon knowing that a person has diabetes, they might not think about it, let it pass, or convince oneself that they don’t know what the doctors are talking about is denial.

Denial is not necessarily a bad thing. It can help people adjust to living with diabetes. By putting their emotions on hold, they can better deal with the shock of absorbing all the new information and medical information. By pretending they don’t have diabetes or that diabetes is not that of a big deal, they can avoid feeling overly stressed out, angry or depressed while they begin to fathom all the changes that lie ahead. However, if they stay in denial for too long, they run greater risk to neglecting their health and not taking care of their diabetes.

This can cause emergency situations to occur in the short term and can also lead to serious problems in the long term. Diabetes is a manageable disease if they keep their blood glucose under control. By doing this, they can avoid many of the debilitating complications of diabetes such as eye, heart, kidney disease, stroke and infection. But it is up to them to take charge of their diabetes and make those changes that will ensure a long and healthy life. Breaking out of denial may take some work. But at the end of it, they will feel relieved. If they feel overwhelmed, they have to talk to doctors mmediately or to diabetes educator. Denial and other feelings such as guilt and anger are part of living with diabetes for many people. They may come and go as life changes and as diabetes changes over the course of a lifetime. When they find out they have diabetes or during the cause of adjusting to diabetes, they are likely to experience feelings of anger. They may feel that life is treating them unfairly. They might start to feel angry once they have gotten over denial. Or they may find that feelings of anger coexist with feelings of denial, depression or anxiety.

The may find their selves angry when confronted with some of the problems brought on by diabetes. Or they may find that they flare up in the situations that have nothing to do with diabetes. All of these feelings are natural reaction to dealing with difficult condition. Anger is common as people adjust to diabetes. It is normal to feel angry over something they feel they can’t control. A good way to deal with anger and other bad feelings is to recognize the Feelings, realize they are normal, and find ways to channel their energy that will help them take charge of their diabetes.

Here are some ways to deal with anger: 1. Recognize anger and take responsibility for it. 2. Start to keep of their angry episodes and the events that trigger their anger. ( journal notes. ) 3. Avoid situations that cause anger. 4. Join a support group, talk with other people or seek the help of a professional counselor. People can let anger eat away at themselves and make them miserable or they can think of it as unharmessed energy. By using that energy can make something positive. Their anger may be telling their selves that they are due for a change in their lives.

Educate themselves about diabetes and become their own health advocate. People with diabetes, as well as doctors and researchers, have long suspected that stress can affect blood glucose control. Although there is no clear evidence that stress alone can cause any disease, it is possible that it can bring on or worsen symptoms in someone already headed for disease. Stress is a double-edged sword for people with diabetes, as with many chronic diseases. Stress may contribute to symptoms of the disease, and the disease itself can trigger stress. Diabetes can chum up real, imagined or expected stresses in all of us.

It can make us feel as though we can no longer control our own body, making ourselves feel helpless and out of control. It can cause anger, may find ourselves in denial, experience depression or helplessness. It can also lower self-esteem and lead to think there is something wrong with us. If they tend to internalize stress, remind them that diabetes is not their fault and that they can take positive steps to deal with their conditions. Recognize that everyone has choice in life and they make their own choices. Pace themselves. Avoid excessive behavior.

Make it a point to identify the things that stress someone out, and devise ways to deal with them. Trying to find healthy ways to deal with feelings of loneliness, low self-esteem, anger and other uncomfortable emotions can also help to avoid stress. The diagnosis of diabetes, a lifelong disease with many possible complications, has a dramatic impact on the child and the child’s family. The first phase of the disease, especially, which precipitates a state of “shock,” is very difficult. Children and adolescents with emotional problems antedating the diabetes have more difficulties adjusting to the rules of diabetic management.

Emotional and behavior problems occur more frequently in adolescents. They may lead to lack of diabetes control, brittle diabetes, and depression. A multidisciplinary team composed of a social worker and psychologist, in addition to the medical team, is very useful in solving those problems, as well as indispensable to help maintain compliance for many years. [8] III. Research Methodology Chapter 3 provides the readers with the information about the procedures on how the research gathered data. This chapter shows the step by step process of gathering, tallying and collating data.

These are reflected in the following sub-topics: 1. Research Design 2. Respondents 3. Instrument Used 4. Data Gathering 5. Statistical Treatment Research Design In this research, “Emotional Effects of Juvenile Diabetes in Children” the researchers use the descriptive method. A survey as conducted to persons since birth up to age 16 whether female or male who has Juvenile Diabetes and ages 17 up to 75 who had Juvenile Diabetes since birth up to age 16. The researchers decided to use questionnaires because it is the simplest and fastest way to gather essential data.

The Respondents The researchers conducted a survey to persons since birth up to age 16 and ages 17 up to 75 who had Juvenile Diabetes since birth up to age 16, about the “Emotional Effects of Juvenile Diabetes in Children. ” The researchers chose twenty three (23) respondents who were affected by Juvenile Diabetes to answer the questionnaire. The researchers used simple random sampling in choosing the respondents. The Summarized Distribution of Female and Male Respondents for those who were affected by Juvenile Diabetes Respondents |Number of Respondents |Percentage | |Female |14 |61% | |Male |9 |39% | |Total |23 |100% | Research Instrument

The researchers administered a questionnaire to determine the “Emotional Effects of Juvenile Diabetes in Children. ” The questionnaire is made up of three parts. The first part are questions which determines what kind of Diabetes they have, their target range for blood glucose and when did they have Juvenile Diabetes or what so called as Insulin Dependent. The second part is about their condition and how they cope up with the disease. It also talks about the emotions they had. The third part is about in question number fourteen (14) which talks about the emotions they felt.

In the first part of the questionnaire, there are certain choices that they can choose from to answer the questions. In the second part of the survey there are three (3) choices: Yes, No and Others in which they can state their desired answer. In the third part of the questionnaire, the respondents were asked to encircle the given choices that correspond to the emotions that they have and other emotions felt aside from the given choices. The survey is the key in determining the emotional effects of Juvenile Diabetes in children and the possible remedies to those emotions. Data Gathering Procedure

The researchers had conducted a survey to those who were affected by Juvenile Diabetes. The survey was conducted on the months of January to February this year. The survey questionnaires were prepared by the researchers in accordance with the rules and instructions laid by the Professor. After preparing the questionnaire, the researchers submit it to their Professor for the approval. After which the researchers then have it photocopied. Then the researchers, before conducting the survey, prepared the permission letter and ask the Professor and the head nurse of a hospital before they set period of surveying.

The researchers then conducted the survey to those who were affected by Juvenile Diabetes. 23 persons ,since birth up to age 16 whether female or male who has Juvenile Diabetes and ages 17 up to 75 who had Juvenile Diabetes since birth up to age 16, were chosen by the researchers through a simple random sampling. A short introduction of the topic, instructions and some guidelines were given by the assigned member. After their period of thinking, the researchers then requested their respondents to pass the survey forms.

To prove that the emotions are true, the researchers ask questions through questionnaire which is divided into three parts: information about their disease, their condition of having it and emotions they felt. The questionnaire is all about their disease and specifically, the emotions and their condition. Statistical Treatment After administering the survey to those who were affected by Juvenile Diabetes, the researchers then tallied and collated the results or the answers of the survey and made through analysis of the gathered data.

The analysis of data and statistical figures were all based in the results of the tallied survey. The researchers made use of the formula to find the weighted mean and arbitrary level of each question. The formula used to obtain the weighted mean is illustrated below: WM=f x / n Whereas:WM = represents the weighted mean f = represents the frequency n = represents the number of exponents The formula used to obtain the percentage is illustrated below: P= n/N *100 Whereas:P = represents the percentage n = represents the small portion N = represents the total number IV. Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data

This chapter presents, analyzes and interprets the data gathered through the use of the questionnaire method. Thus, the graphical presentations and discussions were organized based on the problems used in this study. Question #1 Do you have diabetes? [pic][pic] [pic] As shown in Graph 1, the total number of respondents is 23 which is 100%, 14 or 61% are female and 9 or 39% are male. There are 18 respondents or 78% who answered yes and 5 or 21% respondents who answered no. 18 or 100% respondents are Type 1 (Juvenile, insulin-dependent). Question #2 Target range for blood glucose [pic]

As shown in Graph 2, 10 or 55% respondents have a blood glucose level of 70-150, 6 or 33% respondents have a blood glucose level of 70-180 while 2 or 11% respondents have other blood glucose level ranging from 90-120. Question # 3 When did you have Juvenile Diabetes? [pic] As shown in Graph 3, there are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total respondents who had Juvenile Diabetes since birth. This is followed by 2 respondents with a percentage equivalent to 11% of the respondents who had Juvenile Diabetes from 1-5 years old. There are 5 respondents which has an equivalent of 27% who had Juvenile Diabetes from 6-10 years old. or 44 % respondents had Juvenile Diabetes from 11-16 years old. Question # 4 Does it run in your family? [pic] As shown in Graph 4, there are 16 respondents which is 69% of the total respondents who answered yes, it runs in their family. This is followed by 6 respondents who answered no; it does not run in their family with a percentage equivalent of 26%. There is 1 respondent which is 5% who answered that she doesn’t know if it runs in their family. Question # 5 Are you feeling down when you see people eating the foods which you cannot eat anymore? [pic]

As shown in Graph 5, there are 14 respondents which is 78% of the total respondents who answered yes, they are feeling down when they see people eating the foods which they can’t eat anymore. This is followed by 2 respondents with a percentage equivalent of 11% who answered no, they don’t feel down. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered sometimes they feel down. Question # 6 Are you eating sweets at your parents or guardians back? [pic] As shown in Graph 6, there are 7 respondents which is 39% of the total respondents eat sweets behind their parents or guardians back.

This is followed by 7 respondents with a percentage equivalent of 39% who answered they don’t eat sweets at their parents back. There are 4 respondents which is 22% who answered sometimes they eat sweets behind their parents and guardians back. Question # 7 Do you feel jealous when you see persons eating all the food they can eat? [pic] As shown in Graph 7, there are 8 respondents which is 45% of the total respondents who answered yes; they feel jealous seeing people eating foods which they can’t eat anymore. This is followed by 7 respondents with a percentage equivalent of 39% who answered no.

There are 3 respondents which is 16% answered others (2 answered sometimes and 1 answered not really). Question # 8 Is it hard for you to control your diet? [pic] As shown in Graph 8, there are 12 respondents which is 67% of the total respondents who answered yes, it is hard for them to control their diet. This is followed by 4 respondents with the equivalent of 73% who answered no; it is not hard for them to control their diet. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others. Question # 9 Are you satisfied with your condition right now? [pic]

As shown in Graph 9, there are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they are satisfied with their condition. This is followed by 13 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 73% who answered no; they are not satisfied with their condition. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others. One answered not really but she can deal with it while the other answered that she is just living with it as she learn to do so as years passed by. Question # 10 Are embarrassed or do you feel ashamed because of your disease? [pic]

As shown in Graph 10, there are 2 respondents which is 12% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they feel embarrassed or ashamed because of their disease. This is followed by 16 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 88% who answered no, they don’t feel embarrassed or ashamed because of their disease. There is no one who answered others. Question # 11 Does anyone tease you or make fun of you because of your condition? [pic] As shown in Graph 11, there are 5 respondents which is 27% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they’ve been teased and made frown ecause of their condition. This is followed by 12 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 67% who answered no, they’ve been not teased and made frown because of their condition. There is 1 respondent which is 6% who answered others, he sometimes been teased and made frown because of his condition. Question # 12 Do you think that having Juvenile Diabetes is a hindrance to you? Why? [pic] As revealed in Graph 12, there are 12 respondents which is 67% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, thinks that Juvenile Diabetes is a hindrance to them.

This is followed by 5 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 27% who answered no, Juvenile Diabetes is not a hindrance to them. There is 1 respondent which is 6% who answered others. She thinks that having Juvenile Diabetes is a hindrance to her before, but now she doesn’t think so. Question #13 Is it possible for you to be emotional imbalance because of your illness? [pic] As revealed in Graph 13, there are 10 respondents which is 56% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, that it is possible for them to become emotional imbalance because of their illness.

This is followed by 6 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 33% who answered no, that it is not possible for them to become emotional imbalance because of their illness. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others. They sometimes think that it is possible for them to become emotional imbalance because of their illness. Question # 14 What emotion/s did you when you knew when you had Juvenile Diabetes? [pic] As revealed in Graph 14, there are 4 respondents who answered that they were surprised or 17. 39%. There are 7 respondents who answered that they felt sad or 30. 33%.

There is 1 respondent that she felt angry which is 4. 35%. There are 6 respondents who answered that they feel feared which is 26. 09%. There is 1 respondent who answered that he felt guilty which is 4. 35%. There is 1 respondent that felt loved which 4. 35%. There are 3 respondents which is 13. 04% who answered others with a specific emotion they felt. One answered that she doesn’t remember herself feeling anything that time. The other one answered that she felt self-pity, curious and hatred. The remaining one felt no emotion at all. Question # 15 Do you follow what the doctor is prescribing you? pic] As revealed in Graph 13, there are 14 respondents which is 78% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they are following the prescription of the doctor. This is followed by 2 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 11% who answered no, they do not follow the prescription of the doctor. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others which is sometimes. Question # 16 Can you cope with your disease? [pic] As revealed in Graph 16, there are 14 respondents which is 78% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they can cope up with the disease.

This is followed by 1 respondent with the percentage equivalent of 6% who answered no, she can’t cope up with the disease. There are 3 respondents which is 16% who answered others. The two answered that they can sometimes cope up with the disease. The remaining one answered that most of the times yes, sometimes no for it depends on the mood. Question # 17 Do you feel weak now that you have it? [pic] As revealed in Graph 17, there are 6 respondents which is 33% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they feel weak of having it.

This is followed by 11 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 62% who answered no, they are not weak of having it. There is 1 respondent which is 6% who answered others, which is not really. Question # 18 Does it affect your relationship with friends, family or peers? [pic] As revealed in Graph 18, there are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, it affects their relationship. This is followed by 13 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 73% who answered no, it does not affect their relationship with others.

There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others. One answered sometimes it affects the relationship while the other one answered that it doesn’t really affect the relationship. Question # 19 Can you live with this for as long as you live? [pic] As revealed in Graph 19, there are 9 respondents which is 51% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, they can live with the disease for as long as they live. This is followed by 7 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 38% who answered no, they can’t live with it for the rest of their lives.

There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others. One answered hopefully not while the other said that he can live with it. Question # 20 Is there any chance that you’ll think of emotion as a hindrance to your illness? [pic] As revealed in Graph 20, there are 7 respondents which is 38% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, emotions is hindrance to their illness. This is followed by 9 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 51% who answered no, it is not a hindrance to their illness. There are 2 respondents which is 11% who answered others.

One answered sometimes that emotions is a hindrance to her while the other one answered emotions is not really a hindrance to him. Question # 21 Are convinced that ignoring emotions would a confidence in you? [pic] As revealed in Graph 21, there are 11 respondents which is 62% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, ignoring emotions would build a confidence to them. This is followed by 7 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 38% who answered no, ignoring it would not build a confidence to them. There is no one who answered others.

Question # 22 Should your teacher or school nurse be alerted with the situation? [pic] As revealed in Graph 22, there are 11 respondents which is 62% of the total number of respondents who answered yes, the teacher and school nurse should be alerted. This is followed by 4 respondents with the percentage equivalent of 22% who answered no, they should not be alerted. There are 3 respondents which is 16% who answered others. One answered sometimes they should be alerted. The other one said maybe while the remaining one said that it is not applicable anymore. V.

Summary of Findings, Conclusions, and Recommendations This chapter presents the summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations of the study. Brief Review of the Study The study was undertaken find out the emotional effects of juvenile diabetes in children since birth up to age 16 by freshmen students of Assumption College taking up Management in Corporate Business. Specifically, this study seeks to answer the following questions: 1. Do you have diabetes? If YES, is it Type 1 (Juvenile, insulin dependent)Type 2 (Adult-onset, non-insulin dependent) 2.

Target range for blood glucose is 1. 70 – 150 2. 70 – 180 3. When did you have Juvenile diabetes? 1. since birth 2. 1 – 5 yrs old 3. 6 – 10 yrs old 4. 11 – 16 yrs old 4. Does it run in your family? 5. Are you feeling down when you see people eating the foods which you cannot anymore eat? (e. g. chocolate or sweets) 6. Are you eating sweets at your parents or guardians back? 7. Do you feel jealous when you see persons eating all the food they can eat? 8. Is it hard for you to control your diet? 9. Are you satisfied with your condition right now? 10.

Are you embarrassed or do you feel ashamed because of your disease? 11. Does anyone tease you and make you frown because of your condition? 12. Do you think that having Juvenile diabetes is a hindrance to you? Explain. 13. Is it possible for you to be emotional imbalance because of your illness? 14. What emotion did you feel when you knew that you have Juvenile diabetes? 1. Surprise14. 4 Fear 2. Sad14. 5 Guilty 3. Angry14. 5 Love 14. 6 Others 15. Do you follow what the doctor is prescribing you? 16. Can you cope with your disease? 17. Do you feel weak now that you have it? 8. Does it affect your relationship with friends, family or peers? 19. Can you live with this for as long as you live? 20. Is there any chance that you’ll think of emotions as a hindrance in your illness? 21. Are you convinced that ignoring emotions would build a confidence in you? 22. Should your teacher or school nurse be alerted with the situation? Summary of Findings The statement of the problem served as a frame of reference in presenting the salient findings of the research. There were twenty-three (23) respondents, fourteen (14) are female and nine (9) were men. 1.

Children who have and doesn’t have Juvenile Diabetes There were 18 respondents or 78% have Juvenile diabetes and are Type one (1) or Insulin dependent while 5 or 21% doesn’t have Juvenile diabetes. 2. Target Blood Glucose Level There were 10 or 55% respondents have a blood glucose level of 70 -150 which is still normal, 6 or 33% respondents have a blood glucose level of 70 -180 which indicates hyperglycemia while 2 or 11% respondents have other blood glucose level ranging from 90 -120 which is also normal. If blood glucose level is below 70, it shows that the person is hypoglycemic. 3.

Ages of having Juvenile Diabetes There are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total respondents who had Juvenile diabetes since birth. This is followed by 2 respondents with a percentage equivalent to 11% of the respondents who had Juvenile diabetes from 1-5 years old. There are 5 respondents which has an equivalent of 27% who had Juvenile diabetes from 6-10 years old and 8 or 44% respondents had Juvenile diabetes from ages 11 – 16 years old. 4. Diabetes runs in the family or not There are 16 respondents which is 69% of the total respondents said that diabetes runs in their family which is genetically inherited.

This is followed by 6 respondents or 26% said that diabetes does not run in their family which means that they just acquired it while 1 respondent or 5% answered that she doesn’t know if diabetes runs in their family or not. 5. Feels down or not when seeing people eating foods that they cannot eat Most of the respondents which are 14 or 78% of the total respondents feel down when they see people eating the foods which they cannot eat anymore. This is followed by 2 respondents with a percentage of 11% doesn’t feel down while 2 respondents which is 11% sometimes feel down. 6.

Eats sweets at their parents or guardians back or not There are 7 respondents which is 39% of the total respondents eats sweets behind their parents or guardians back. This is followed by 7 respondents with a percentage equivalent of 39% doesn’t eat sweets behind their parents back which indicates that they obey their parents orders while 4 respondents which is 22% sometimes eat sweets behind their parents or guardians back. 7. Feels jealous or not Most of the respondents which is 8 or 45% of the total respondents feel jealous seeing people eating foods which they can’t eat anymore.

Followed by 7 respondents which is 39% doesn’t feel jealous while 3 respondents or 16% sometimes feel jealous. 8. Hard to control diet or not Most of the respondents which is 12 or 67% of the total respondents have a hard time to control their diet. As seen in questions 5, 6 and 7, it shows that majority of the respondents feels jealous and feels down seeing people eating the foods which they cannot eat and eats behind their parents or guardians back. This shows that it would really be hard for these children to control their diet since they are tempted to live like the others who can eat whatever they want.

This is followed by 4 respondents or 73% who doesn’t have hard time to control their diet while 2 respondents or 11% answered others. 9. Satisfied with condition or not There are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total number of respondents are satisfied with their condition since they knew that they’re going to live with juvenile diabetes for as long as they live. Most of the respondents which is 13 or 73% respondents are not satisfied with their condition for they look forward to a cure for juvenile diabetes and that they can’t do the things that they used to do and be like normal people, feeling nothing and is healthy.

While 2 respondents which is 11% said that she is not really satisfied with her condition but she can deal with it and the other said that she is just living with it. 10. Feels embarrassed, ashamed or not There are 2 respondents which is 12% of the total number of respondents feels embarrassed or ashamed especially when they can’t eat what they want and whenever they inject themselves with insulin while most of the respondents which is 16 or 88% doesn’t feel ashamed or embarrassed because it is not their fault that they genetically inherited and acquired such disease. They just have to deal with it. 1. Tease, make frown or not There are 5 respondents which is 27% of the total number of respondents have been teased and made frown of their condition like when they can’t eat sweets such as chocolate and they inject themselves with insulin. Most of the respondent which is 12 or 67% have not been teased and made frown because of their condition. While 1 respondent or 6% has sometimes been teased and made frown. 12. Juvenile Diabetes a hindrance or not Most of the respondents which is 12 or 67% of the total number of respondents think that Juvenile diabetes is a hindrance to them.

Some of the reasons why they think having such disease is a hindrance to them are: they don’t feel right, they can’t eat what they want like sweets, they can’t do the things that they want to do or their activities are very limited, it affects their daily living especially at work and in school, they don’t feel like a normal person and parents become overprotective and it sometimes irritates them. This is followed by 5 respondents with the percentage of 27% who thinks that juvenile diabetes is not a hindrance to them since they can still do their own stuff even though it is limited.

Lastly, there is 1 respondent which is 6% answered that for her, having juvenile diabetes is a hindrance to her but now, not anymore. Controlling and acceptance is all they have to have. 13. Emotional imbalance or not Most of the respondents which is 10 or 56% of the total number of respondents said that it is possible for them to become emotional imbalance since having diabetes affects the mood of the person and so it affects the emotions as well. Being stress and depressed leads to emotional imbalance.

This is followed by 6 respondents or 33% said that it is not possible for them to become emotional imbalance since they have it already and must live with it. While 2 respondents or 11% sometimes think that it is possible for them to become emotional imbalance because of their illness. 14. Emotions felt There are 4 respondents of 17. 39% were surprised when they knew they had juvenile diabetes. It is something new to them and would lead them to more responsibility. Most of the respondents which is 7 or 30. 33% felt sad. They don’t expect such illness so they feel depressed and different.

There is 1 respondent or 4. 35% felt angry because diabetes runs in her family so she blamed her parents and herself of just letting such illness to happen. There are 6 respondents or 26. 09% who feared for they think that having diabetes is a threat and a hindrance to them. There is 1 respondent or 4. 35% who felt guilty despite of the fact that diabetes runs in their family but she still disobeyed her parents warnings. There is 1 respondent or 4. 35% who felt love because when she knew she had diabetes, it made her family closer and well protected.

While there are 3 respondents or 13. 04% with a specific emotion felt. One said that she can’t remember herself feeling anything that time, the other felt self-pity, curious and hatred while the other felt no emotion at all. 15. Follows doctor prescription or not Most of the respondents which Is 14 or 78% of the total number of respondents follows the prescription of the doctor. Followed by 2 respondents or 11% does not follow the prescription of the doctor while 2 respondents or 11% sometimes follows the prescription of the doctor. 16. Coped with the disease or not

Most of the respondents which is 14 or 78% of the total number of respondents can cope with the disease since they had this for a long time already so they eventually accepted the fact that they have juvenile diabetes. This is followed by 1 respondent or 6% cannot cope with the disease since her activities are limited while 3 respondents or 16% can sometimes cope with the disease. It just depends on the mood. 17. Feels weak or not There are 6 respondents which is 33% of the total number of respondent feels weak of having juvenile diabetes since activities are limited and they can’t eat what they used to eat.

Most of the respondents which is 11 or 62% do not feel weak of having it since they already accepted the fact that they have juvenile diabetes and they’re going to live with it forever. While 1 respondent which is 6% does not really feel weak of having juvenile diabetes. 18. Affects relationship with others or not There are 3 respondents which is 16% of the total number of respondents said that having juvenile diabetes affects their relationship with others since parents become too overprotective which is irritating so it leads to misunderstanding. And the other is that they are pitied by others or are teased by others.

Most of the respondent which is 13 or 73% said that having juvenile diabetes does not affect the relationship with others. It actually deepened their relationship. While 2 respondents or 11% said sometimes having juvenile diabetes affects the relationship with others. 19. Can live with diabetes or not Most of the respondents which is 51% of the total number of respondents can live with the disease since they have already accepted it and had deal with it. This is followed by 7 respondents or 38% cannot live with diabetes since they look forward to a cure for it.

While 2 respondents or 11% said that they can hopefully live with it. 20. Emotions, a hindrance or not There are 7 respondents which is 38% of the total number of respondent thinks of emotions as a hindrance to their illness. Well of course, in every sickness, the emotions of the person would definitely be affected. Likely, the person would feel weak, different and moody. Most of the respondents which is 9 with a percentage equivalent of 51% do not think of emotion as hindrance to their illness. They believe that sickness and emotions are separated but at one point is connected.

While 2 respondents or 11% sometimes thinks of emotions as a hindrance to them. 21. Ignoring emotions would build a confidence or not Most of the respondents which is 11 or 62% of the total number of respondents are convinced that ignoring emotions would build a confidence in them because emotions can also destroy a person that will lead to insecurity. While 7 respondents or 38% are convinced that ignoring emotions would not build a confidence in them since confidence involves other aspects not just emotions. 22. Should the teacher or school nurse be alerted or not

Most of the respondent which is 11 or 62% of the total number of respondents said that the school nurse or teacher should be alerted with their condition since blood glucose level changes so it affects their health. This is followed by 4 respondents or 22% said that the school nurse or teacher should not be alerted since they knew how to control and deal with their health. While 3 respondents or 16% said that sometimes they should be alerted. Conclusion Based on the significant findings of the study, the following conclusions were drawn: 1.

Most of the respondents have diabetes and are type 1 or Juvenile diabetic. Most of the respondents too are female than male. 2. The target range of blood glucose level is lies more on 70 – 150 mg/dl, therefore it implies that these children under this range has a normal blood glucose level. 3. Most of the respondents had juvenile diabetes from ages 11 – 16 years old. 4. Juvenile diabetes runs more in the family or is genetically inherited than acquired. 5. Most of the respondents which is 785 of the total respondents feel down seeing people eating the foods which they cannot anymore eat. . There is an equal equivalence of 39% of respondents who eat and do not eat behind their parents or guardians back. 7. Most respondents which is 45% of the total number of respondent feels jealous seeing people eating foods which they cannot eat anymore. 8. Most of the respondents which is 67% have a hard time to control their diet. 9. Most of the respondents which is 73% are not satisfied with their condition of having juvenile diabetes. 10. Most of the respondents which is 88% of the total number of respondents do not feel embarrassed or ashamed because of their disease. 11.

Most of the respondents have been teased and made frown because of their condition. 12. Most of the respondents thinks of having Juvenile diabetes as a hindrance to them since they don’t feel right, they can’t eat what they want like sweets, they can’t do the things that they want to do or their activities are very limited, it affects their daily living especially at work and in school, they don’t feel like a normal person and parents become overprotective and it sometimes irritates them. 13. Most of the respondents think that it is possible for them to become emotional imbalance because of their illness. 4. There were different emotions presented but the most emotion felt is sadness, followed by fear, surprise, others which includes self-pity, hatred and curious, then angry, guilt and love. 15. Most of the respondents follow what the doctor is prescribing them to maintain a healthy life. 16. Most of the respondents which is 78% of the total number of respondent can cope up with their disease. 17. Most of the respondents do not feel weak of having juvenile diabetes. 18. The relationship of the respondents with family, friends and peers do not affect their relationship. 9. The respondents can live with Juvenile diabetes as long as they live. 20. Most of the respondents do not think of emotions as a hindrance to their illness. 21. 62% of the total number of respondents are convinced that ignoring emotions would build a confidence to them. 22. The teacher or school nurse should be alerted with the situation of the respondents who has juvenile diabetes. Recommendations In line with the significant findings of the study, the following recommendations are offered: 1. Diabetes is one of the leading major causes of death in the Philippines.

A person must be aware of his or her health. As early as possible, have a check up with the doctor to see if there is any susceptibility of acquiring diabetes or not. 2. Diabetes whether type 1 or type 2 must follow doctor’s prescription or recommendation to avoid low and high blood glucose level and change in diet. 3. Diabetic children eating sweets behind their parents or guardians back and children feeling jealous seeing people eating all the foods they can’t eat, should not be conscious about it since it is one way of disciplining a person and to avoid complications later on. . Diabetic children who is not satisfied with their condition, feels embarrassed or ashamed because of their disease and thinks of having juvenile diabetes is a hindrance to them should not think of these things. There’s no one to be blamed about this and scientist are doing their best to find a cure for juvenile diabetes. Controlling, dealing and acceptance is all they have to have to not be emotionally imbalance, to not feel weak about it, to not affect the relationship with family, friends and peers and to be able to cope with the disease. . Emotions can build confidence, can change one’s lifestyle and as well as destroy especially when diagnosed with juvenile diabetes. There are several ways to deal with different emotions as mentioned in the study of related literature of this paper. Learning how to cope with one’s feelings can help build a new personality. 6. One of the tasks that comes with having diabetes is educating others in the workplace, the schools, and the society about what they need to live well with diabetes. 7.

For those who are being teased, made frown or discriminated, the best course of action is first educate and negotiate, then litigate, and last legislate others about a diabetic person’s needs, limitations, strengths, and by informing them of the rights and responsibilities can help resolve many situation. 8. For conditions that the school nurse or teacher should be alerted, training them should be developed and implemented by diabetes health care professionals, school health care providers and school administration.

Bibliography • Websites www. fda. gov/fdac/features/2000/400_diab. html http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/diabetes

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