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Define Mobile Menu

A simple, searchable online database made up of structured records whose content is generated by the participants. The records normally contain personal information relating to a set of individuals. The database is self-perpetuating in that in order to access it, participants are usually made to submit their own information. Usually incorporates instant messaging capability for connecting participants based on a match. Purpose The purpose of this method is to ‘find’ others with matching needs or take control over your data.

For example, matching interests in order to connect or trade. Participants benefit from being able to use a single touch point for identifying matches and are able to compare offers from a pool of potentially similar records. Improves the likelihood of success through pre-vetting. Strengths * Can offer anonymity while retaining high levels of personal detail and control over how these are shared (i. e. citizen held records). * May include advanced testing to determine compatibility or matches between participants and records. Useful research tool, e. g. for determining average prices. Weaknesses * There is often a charge to access the database. * Sometimes there can be a stigma associated with being on a private database (e. g. if participants are looking to date). * Can soon become out of date and usefulness out of perspective if inactive records are not deleted. End users are those persons who interact with the application directly. They are responsible to insert, delete and update data in the database. They get information from the system as and when required. Types: ) Direct users: Direct users are the users who se the computer, database system directly, by following instructions provided in the user interface. They interact using the application programs already developed, for getting the desired result. E. g. People at railway reservation counters, who directly interact with database. b) Indirect users: Indirect users are those users, who desire benefit from the work of DBMS indirectly. They use the outputs generated by the programs, for decision making or any other purpose. They are just concerned with the output and are not bothered about the programming part.

There are several categories of end users: 1. Casual end users occasionally access the database, but they may need different information each time. They use a sophisticated database query language to specify their requests and are typically middle- or high-level managers or other occasional browsers. 2. Naive or parametric end users make up a sizable portion of database end users. Their main job function revolves around constantly querying and updating the database, using standard types of queries and updates-called canned transactions-that have been carefully programmed and tested.

The tasks that such users perform are varied: Bank tellers check account balances and post withdrawals and deposits. Reservation clerks fur airlines, hotels, and car rental companies check availability for a given request and make reservations. Clerks at receiving stations for courier mail enter package identifications via bar codes and descriptive information through buttons to update a central database of received and in-transit packages. 3.

Sophisticated end users include engineers, scientists, business analysts, and others who thoroughly familiarize themselves with the facilities of the DBMS so as to implement their applications to meet their complex requirements. 4. Stand-alone users maintain personal databases by using ready-made program packages that provide easy-to-use menu-based or graphics-based interfaces. An example is the user of a tax package that stores a variety of personal financial data for tax purposes.