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One of the barriers I have encountered to become a professional nurse was a multicultural issue. In nursing school, I learned how to respect the rights and dignity of all patients. Here in Miami, a cosmopolitan city, I had the opportunity to interact with family and patients from other cultures. In my personal case, I have learned that I do not need to understand all beliefs completely, but I do need to respect them. For example, some manifestations of this barrier were: discrimination, racism, prejudice, religion.

I learned how to manage them calling the clients by their names or asking how they wish to be addressed, always demonstrating respect; no making assumptions about other individuals’ beliefs; asking questions about cultural practices in a professional and thoughtful manner, if necessary; and making and effort to gain the client’s trust. Another one was financial barrier. When I came to this country, I was unable to make the payments needed to pay for my classes.

I found my personal strengths that I could use in terms of overcoming this barrier. As many people, I had two full time jobs to afford all classes and requirements that I needed to be accepted into the Nursing Program. Besides that, I had financial aid that was very helpful. The last but not least important barrier to become a nurse was the barrier of language. Communication is essential to providing quality patient care.

This barrier creates a void in health care quality and safety that has effects on health care professionals. I have never studied English before and it was a strong barrier that I had to face. I passed the six levels of English courses at MDC. I completed them with a great GPA that permitted me to start the Nursing Generic Program but……until today I still improving my second language: “English”. Theory of Interpersonal Relations for me is very important in developing nurse-patient relationships.

It’s necessary for regaining health and well-being. I used healthy interpersonal skills to reduce stress and conflict, improve my communication with patients and care givers, enhance intimacy, increase understanding, and promote joy. I can express myself and my rights without violating the rights of others. Also knowing how to recognize and express anger appropriately can help me to reach goals, handle emergencies, solve problems and even protect my health.