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This speech was clear and direct to the point, especially both parables David told. He did not force his ideas; he merely explained his realizations and suggested actions. It is how he said it though, that made me want to listen to him more. I strongly agree with the suggestion of taking the spotlight away from ourselves and our misfortunes and pointing it towards other things and people we encounter. Some people are really egocentric to care about others and their problems (which are probably worse than theirs).

This type of self-centred thinking affects our mood in a way where it may dampen our happiness. His speech raised my awareness on the arrogance of some people, and of mine too at times. He talked about learning to think, learning to control what you think. I feel that that is a step close to being a more positive and happy person. If you submit yourself to negativity, it will ruin you. We have choices; it’s just a matter of making the right one not only for you but for everyone involved.

What struck me the most was what he called the Capital T– Truth which is what matters — life before death. His message was to not stick to a routine just because you are afraid of change. Do not be dull, be alive. The major lesson I took from his speech was to enjoy every experience life offers us to make the most of our lives instead of living in the fast lane which will cause us to forget what and how things happened. Our lives are limited and so we shouldn’t make the least of it by worrying about mishaps and troubles. If we do, then that is truly a life wasted.