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Marinesct to gain from the Air Force Academy experience and how will it help you in your Air Force career? (250 to 300 words, 3000 characters max) My initial interest in the Air Force Academy was sparked when I accompanied my parents to a Military Child Education Coalition conference in the summer of 2004. My father and I, not involved in the conference, decided to spend the week exploring the Colorado Springs area, and after touring for several days, decided to go to what my father called “Zoomie U”. We took the typical summer tourist tour, but I was enthralled. The chapel, the mountains, and the campus excited me, despite my youth.

I spent the rest of the vacation asking questions on how to go to the Academy, what I could do in the Air Force, and a slew of other inquiries. Years later, as a high school junior, I visited again, and made firm my earlier decision: I must apply. Since I first entertained the idea of going to the Air Force Academy, I have considered several fields, namely; pilot, navigator, air battle manager, intelligence, and even technical fields such as meteorology and engineering. There honestly is no particular field which calls me; any career in the Air Force is worth having.

The education received from a top-rate school such as the Air Force Academy would assist in all of the above aspirations, from the social networking achieved from the Academy cadets to the loyalty forged in enduring the same system. Also, from what I have learned from Academy alumni, I will value most the combination of education, military training, sports, and sleep. The lesson of time management is taught to ensure that all Air Force officers know its importance in the military, and there is no better classroom for that lesson than a military academy. 2.

Which aspect of the Air Force Academy experience (academic, military training, athletic, social/spiritual) do you anticipate will be most challenging for you? Discuss why and how you expect to succeed in that area. (250 to 300 words, 3000 characters max) To explain, the first part of this is an essay that I began to write, but instead scrapped for the second. Included only if you think it would be better if I stuck to academics instead of athletic performance for USAFA. Also, with the second essay, I have not met length requirements. I have had writer’s block on how to bridge he fifty word difference I have to make up, which is why I haven’t sent in the writing sample yet. From the experiences of others, the most trying part of the Air Force Academy is the curriculum. Oft forgotten is the very narrow acceptance rate, comparable to the Ivy Leagues’ rates. Unlike traditional civilian institutions, the coursework is mandatorily heavy in order to acclimate future Air Force officers to the strain of active duty. Many current cadets return home complaining of how they wish that they were not on holiday leave so they could be studying instead of enjoying their respite.

However, it is a demon Of the many graces I have received from my mother, the least welcome is her extensive cooking. Do not misunderstand me; my mom is an excellent cook. However, she cooks in excess. This is quite apparent when you weigh any family member on a scale: for the most part, all of us could lose a few pounds. Towards the end of my junior year, I realized that it would be essential to the hope of a future military career to lose weight and become what the Air Force calls “fit to fight”. Over summer vacation, I went to the gym every day for hours.

I dieted, ran, and made every attempt to be healthy. While other friends enjoyed their vacations, I was dragging myself to the gym. The carrot-on-a-stick dangling in front of me, the chance at an appointment to the Air Force Academy, however, carried me through. After the course of a few months, progress was visible, and hope was rewarded: I had made the weight standard. I understand that my journey does not stop now – my newfound joy in working out, an activity formerly met with dread, will fit perfectly amongst the Air Force Fighting Falcons. . Describe a setback or ethical dilemma that you have faced. How did you resolve it? How did the outcome affect you? If something similar happens in the future, how would you react? (400 to 500 words, 3000 characters max) As a high school student, I am involved in the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC). Due to high involvement and leadership potential, I was promoted to the Inspector General position, which pertains to Corps discipline and standards.

When I initially accepted the position, I did not fully appreciate the effort or candor required, and it was not until several months into the assignment that I began to. In the AFJROTC chain of command, the Corps Commander has five people directly underneath him, namely; the Deputy Corps Commander, the Inspector General, two squadron commanders, and the Command Chief Master Sergeant. Typically, the Inspector General’s concern is outside of these four, as they should be well behaved due to their high status.

However, one morning, one of the top five publically berated another top five member due to her sexual orientation in the school hallway before class. The current military policy is “don’t ask, don’t tell”; however, the concern was not her sexual orientation, but the fact that a high ranking cadet had shown a lack of awareness and political correctness in the situation. As the offense was public, if I did nothing, it would be an obvious dereliction of duty. If I did do something, it could be seen as selfishness or envy towards the higher ranking (and well connected) cadet officer, making either choice a possible disaster.

Despite the public offense, the nature of the event was private, so I was unable to seek counsel with others, making the decision fully mine. To report or act on it seemed to be the right choice, despite the possible political consequences. I sent an email with the full transcript of events with witnesses, suggestions, and concerns to the SASI, and the event was dealt with seriously. The desired effect was achieved – I was not criticized, the offending cadet was punished but rehabilitated, and everyone understood the importance of understanding.

If faced with the same situation, I would not act differently. In retrospect, my concerns of how people perceived my actions were erroneous, as they do not always coincide with the truthful course of action. Mark Twain once wrote that one should “always tell the truth, that way you don’t have to remember what you said”, and this sums what should have been the focal point of my decision. The only variable in it should have been “Is it the truth? “. Once again, thank you for any assistance rendered. Anything helps. My desire to attend a military academy has been more of a process for me than a decision.

I grew up the son of a career public servant and was undoubtedly influenced by my upbringing. For over 25 years my father put his life on the line each day as a Federal law enforcement agent to make our nation safer. I have grown up admiring him for his loyalty and selfless commitment. As I consider my future, I know that I want to follow in his footsteps in a public service career that helps ensure the safety and freedom of our great nation. Today, I believe the most serious threat to our nation comes from beyond our borders and that’s why my focus is on serving in the military.

Since 9/11, our nation has led the fight against terrorism but we must continue to lead this fight and step up our efforts to be successful. Our battles have not been easy and they have certainly not been without sacrifice but we are making progress in the war on terror and the youth of our nation, especially our young leaders, must answer the call to serve. I welcome this challenge to serve and I believe our military provides me with the greatest opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities to be highly successful.

For a long time I knew I wanted to serve in the military but I was unsure of the branch of service. My grandfather was a Marine and Korean War veteran; my uncle was a Navy fighter pilot during the Vietnam War; and, a close friend from high school currently attends the Air Force Academy. Earlier this year I was honored to visit the Air Force Academy as a Division 1 soccer recruit. From the moment I stepped on campus it all just seemed to click – the location and setting, the educational opportunities, the esprit de corps, the opportunity to fly, and the chance to play soccer for the Fighting Falcons.

I knew the Air Force was the right career decision for me and the Air Force Academy offered me the very best opportunities for a highly successful future. . I feel very fortunate to be among the group of outstanding young men and women who are being considered for an appointment to the U. S. Air Force Academy and I am honored and humbled by the thought of serving shoulder to shoulder with finest soldiers, sailors, and airmen in the greatest military on earth. Why I Want to Attend a Service Academy It wasn’t until recently that I even knew what the academies were.

They were something brought up in passing, and from that point on I was enamored. I had found the perfect blend of what I expected from my college education, and here it is. The kind of people who attend the academy are some of the most outstanding in our nation. Part of the appeal is serving alongside outstanding individuals who, as a cohesive unit, create the greatest force of men and women in the world. The academy will prepare me not only to be the best that I can be, but help me lead others to become the best they can be.

I believe that the culture of excellence and the notion that mediocrity is a complete tragedy is entirely beautiful. In addition to the moral and leadership benefits, there are more worldly perks, all of which are incredibly substantial. The education at a service academy is world class. I know that what makes this education special is not only the nuts and bolts of mathematics, but the total package. The challenge of succeeding in the rigorous academics while balancing PT and other leadership obligations creates some of the finest men possible, men who’s hands will eventually hold the lives of others.

I find both the challenge and the reward exceptional, but there is so much more to it all. The prestige of the academies, the financial benefits, and the career opportunities are without a doubt attractive, however, they pale in comparison to another part of it. I believe you all would understand better than most the importance of service. It is in being a representative of the people, a supporter of that person, or an armed forces service member that makes every one of you a servant of our country.

We were all born and raised in the greatest country on earth, made so by men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice and spilled their blood in a cause so great and dear to their hearts that it was entirely worth it. This fact does not fall lightly upon me like it does so many others, which is why I owe my life, liberty, and my right to pursue happiness entirely to this great country. It is in things like September 11th or Benghazi that I feel sad and eventually outraged like many others. The difference is that these things do not fade from my mind.

They are as great a travesty now as they were then, and most people do not feel that way. It has become only a memory for many. I believe there is no better way to do right by the people who made this country great than to attend a service academy and serve to keep both their dreams and mine for a prosperous America alive. Thank you for all your help! Why I wish to attend a service academy and serve in the armed forces Strength. Dedication. Discipline. Honor. Pride. These are among my top values. These are the values of every officer in the armed forces. These are the values that currently and will continue to guide me to success.

But there is always room to learn more, and to become an even better person. This is what I believe is waiting for me at the United States Naval Academy. I come from a military family; my parents were one of the only people in my family that did not serve. A few years ago, I saw my grandfather, which turned out to be the last time I would see him. He was Jewish and a Holocaust survivor. He was in multiple labor camps after the Germans invaded Poland and he lost his mother and father. He immigrated to the United States after Americans liberated the camp he was being held in at the time.

He was a Korean War veteran. When I was leaving he pulled me aside and told me “Jonathan I know one day you will make me very, very proud. ” That was the last thing he said to me; a few months later he passed away. I feel that the best way to make him proud is serving my country. After September 11, 2001, I lived in constant fear of another attack. After finally getting over this fear quite recently, I had a revelation: I want to do everything in my power to make sure that in the future, my children won’t have to go through the constant fear and anxiety of worrying about an attack.

I then knew that I was going to be an officer in the United States Marine Corps. I started doing Tang Soo Do at the age of five; I am now a third degree black belt. I now focus on mixed martial arts. Since I was 7 I have hunted with my father. Throughout my experiences, I have built up a solid shell of strength, dedication, discipline, honor, and pride. I feel as though I am on a good track to becoming the man I aspire to be. To truly reach my ultimate goal, I need the help and education that only the service academies can provide. I am frequently berated by both friends and family for my decision to join the marine corps.

They all say “Jon, why would you ever want to join the marines? You can do so much more with your life. ” I feel sorry for each and every one of them. I feel sorry because none of them feel what I feel: the pure love for my country and my freedom and my willingness to preserve them. I can do so much more? I do not see how I can do anything more honorable, more self fulfilling than becoming a Marine Corps officer. Only the best may attend any service academy; I believe that I am among those ranks. It would be no easy task, but I accept the challenge with a smile on my face.

I believe I have what it takes to attend a service academy. Why do you want to attend a service academy? Then read the words and sentences below. Only the ones in blue pertain in the slightest to the essay prompt. (Note: I’m not highlighting repeats because you need not say anything more than once. ) —Strength. —Dedication. —Discipline. —Honor. —Pride. —These are the values of every officer in the armed forces. —These are the values that currently and will continue to guide me to success. —But there is always room to learn more, and to become an even better person. –This is what I believe is waiting for me at the United States Naval Academy. —I come from a military family; my parents were one of the only people in my family that did not serve. —A few years ago, I saw my grandfather, which turned out to be the last time I would see him. —He was Jewish and a Holocaust survivor. —He was in multiple labor camps after the Germans invaded Poland and he lost his mother and father. —He immigrated to the United States after Americans liberated the camp he was being held in at the time. —He was a Korean War veteran. –When I was leaving he pulled me aside and told me “Jonathan I know one day you will make me very, very proud. ” —That was the last thing he said to me; a few months later he passed away. —I feel that the best way to make him proud is serving my country. —After September 11, 2001, I lived in constant fear of another attack. —After finally getting over this fear quite recently, I had a revelation: —I want to do everything in my power to make sure that in the future, my children won’t have to go through the constant fear and anxiety of worrying about an attack. –I then knew that I was going to be an officer in the United States Marine Corps. —I started doing Tang Soo Do at the age of five; I am now a third degree black belt. —I now focus on mixed martial arts. —Since I was 7 I have hunted with my father. —Throughout my experiences, I have built up a solid shell of strength, dedication, discipline, honor, and pride. —I feel as though I am on a good track to becoming the man I aspire to be. —To truly reach my ultimate goal, I need the help and education that only the service academies can provide. –I am frequently berated by both friends and family for my decision to join the marine corps. —They all say “Jon, why would you ever want to join the marines? You can do so much more with your life. ” —I feel sorry for each and every one of them. —I feel sorry because none of them feel what I feel: the pure love for my country and my freedom and my willingness to preserve them. —I can do so much more? —I do not see how I can do anything more honorable, more self fulfilling than becoming a Marine Corps officer. —Only the best may attend any service academy; I believe that I am among those ranks. –It would be no easy task, but I accept the challenge with a smile on my face. —I believe I have what it takes to attend a service academy. 1. When did you first become interested in the Air Force Academy and serving in the Air Force? What started your interest? What Air Force career field do you hope to enter? What do you expect to gain from the Air Force Academy experience and how will it help you in your Air Force career? (250 to 300 words, 3000 characters max) I have always been interested in the military, especially.

Growing up listening to a Great Grandfather talk about World War Two, as well as both of my grandfathers talking about their experiences, peaked my interest in the Air Force Academy. My uncle is a Colonel in the Air Force and I have visited him and his family at almost every base he has been stationed at. These trips have taken me all over the world, from Germany to Hawaii along with various cities throughout the United States. During my visits I have seen many aspects of Air Force life. After each visit I became more interested in the service. I had the privilege of flying one of the actual flight simulators on base in Charleston.

My heart was pounding with excitement after that experience. The most inspiring event was when I got a chance to see my uncle’s Change of Command at Charleston Air Force Base. To see the squadrons at attention, to listen to my uncle’s speech, and to look at my father’s pride for his brother made me realize that I wanted to become an officer as well. The final decision to attend the Air Force Academy culminated in the beginning of my junior year of high school. I began to research more about the Air Force Academy, its expectations and what it would take to be accepted into it.

I then spoke to a family friend who had gone to the United States Air Force Academy, flew fighter planes in the Gulf War and was a former liaison. I sat down at his house as he explained what it takes to not only get into the academy but to succeed as well. He asked me many difficult questions to see if I truly wanted to attend the Air Force Academy and make it my career. He informed me it would be the hardest challenge of my life. I left that meeting knowing for certain that attending the Air Force Academy was what I wanted to do.

I am ultimately hoping to be a pilot, this is probably a common choice but I am also looking at Cost Analysis Officer or Financial Management Officer. I am very good with math and these career fields caught my attention immediately. I looked into both and I can see myself doing either. I expect to gain leadership skills from my experience at the Air Force Academy; this will help me lead the men and women at the highest level which is what is needed. The tactical and military knowledge will also be vitally important as an officer. Also very important, I expect to grow further in my mental and physical abilities.

I know these areas will be pushed to the limit during my career in the Air Force. I also expect to gain a higher level of education as the Air Force Academy is one of the best colleges in the country. This will help me throughout my career and the rest of my life. Specifically I expect to gain the ability to pilot an aircraft and other abilities specific to the Air Force. If I do not become a pilot then I will learn the skills needed for each particular career field. 1. When did you first become interested in the Air Force Academy and serving in the Air Force? What started your interest?

What Air Force career field do you hope to enter? What do you expect to gain from the Air Force Academy experience and how will it help you in your Air Force career? (250 to 300 words, 3000 characters max) This is VERY rough. I haven’t had the chance to edit it very much yet. As a young boy, I spent many long hours imagining I was off on some medieval adventure fighting dragons and fierce enemy knights. While I have grown out of the habit of pretending, I have never lost my desire to fight for the ones I love and demonstrate bravery and courage. Ultimately, it was that desire that first sparked my interest in the military.

The military has been in the back of my mind as a career choice for years. Recently however, it has taken an increased presence in the foreground of my mind. During my sophomore year, one of my biggest role models applied for both the United States Naval and Air Force Academies. He ended up being accepted to both, but chose to attend the Naval Academy. I began to follow in his footsteps and ultimately decided that I would like to attend the Air Force Academy due to my interest in flying. I toured the Academy last spring, and the visit affirmed my decision. Never have I felt such a strong sense of belonging.

I hope to graduate from the Academy and move on to become a pilot. Even if I am not accepted into the Academy, I still plan on attending college, participating in the AFROTC, and applying for pilot school afterward. However, I still believe that the Academy would provide me with the best tools to become an Air Force officer of honor. I anticipate that the Academy will be the most difficult four years of my life, but also the best four. The leadership, selflessness, and integrity taught at the Academy cannot be substituted by any other values taught at any other institution.